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2 edition of Did Origen apply the word Homoousios to the Son? found in the catalog.

Did Origen apply the word Homoousios to the Son?

Hanson, R. P. C Bp of Clogher

Did Origen apply the word Homoousios to the Son?

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Published by Beauchesne in Paris .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Reprinted from Epektasis, a collection in honour of Jean Daniĺou.

Statement(By) Richard P.C. Hanson.
ContributionsDaniélou, Jean., Epektasis.
The Physical Object
Paginationp. 293-303
Number of Pages303
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20118314M

  As Schaff rightly points out with reference to the term itself, “The word was not an invention of the council of Nicea, still less of Constantine, but had previously arisen in theological language, and occurs even in Origen [] and among the Gnostics.” 11 Constantine is not the source or origin of the term, and the council did. The Trinitarian Faith. Origen is quite familiar with the terms "triad" (Trias) and "Hypostaseis," and what they denote are always of the chief characteristics of Origen’s doctrine is: The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are Three Persons (Hypostaseis).He affirms that each of the Three is a distinct Hypostasis, from all eternity, not just as manifested in the "economy," i.e. The other reason for the duration of the controversy was that conservative opinion in the church, although utterly opposed to Arianism, took a long time to shake off Origen’s dubious legacy of “degrees of divinity,” and to accept the validity of the key term homoousios. Many objected because the word . Synonyms for Sabellian in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for Sabellian. 1 word related to Sabellian: Osco-Umbrian. What are synonyms for Sabellian?


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Did Origen apply the word Homoousios to the Son? by Hanson, R. P. C Bp of Clogher Download PDF EPUB FB2

Eusebius was not therefore betraying the thought of Origen when he wrote to the Caesareans that the word homoousios in the Nicene formula connoted an identity of attributes which belonged to the Son as the first born and most perfect of the creatures.(47) He was, if anything, more disloyal to his mentor when he endorsed a creed that applied the word directly to the Godhead; but.

DID ORIGEN APPLY THE WORD HOMOOUSIOS TO THE SON. This essay takes its title from one by Richard Hanson, which gives as its answer a 'decisive no'.1 Mine will be a qualified yes— the more confident, however—in that I argue for an indirect and transient application of the term, which will explain why it does not appear elsewhere in Origen's works and was not adopted by his pupils.

M. EDWARDS; DID ORIGEN APPLY THE WORD HOMOOUSIOS TO THE SON?, The Journal of Theological Studies, Vol Issue 2, 1 OctoberPages –, https:/Cited by: 3. In one fragment preserved by Rufinus in his Latin translation of Pamphilus's Defense of Origen, Origen seems to apply the phrase homooúsios (ὁμοούσιος; "of the same substance") to the relationship between the Father and the Son, but in other passages, Origen rejected the belief that the Son and the Father were one hypostasis as.

The Word “Homoousios” from Hellenism to Christianity. Homoousios is one of the most important words in the Christian theological vocabulary, since it was used at the Council of Nicaea to express the divine consubstantiality of the Son with the by: Homoousios, in Christianity, the key term of the Christological doctrine formulated at the first ecumenical council, held at Nicaea into affirm that God the Son and God the Father are of the same substance.

The First Council of Nicaea, presided over by the emperor Constantine, was convened to resolve the controversy within. How Homoousios Affected Nicea. All of this applied to Arius' theology at the Council of Nicea.

If the Son had a beginning, as Arius was asserting, then he must be made of matter. After all, the substance of God can have no beginning.

On the other hand, if Christ is of God's substance, then he always existed. the Son of God, only-begotten of the Father, that is, of the substance of the Father; God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God; begotten, not made, one in substance [homoousios] with the Father.

The Son, because he is the Logos of God, and. Homoousios (Gk. ὁμοούσιος) means "of the same substance," "of the same essence." Homo means "same" and ousia means "essence." The term was used by Athanasius in his correct teaching of the oneness of the Father and the Son in that they are the same substance, the same essence of divinity.

Homoousios (literally, “same in substance”) was used by Athanasius and others to argue that the Son derives his substance from the Father and hence shares the same substance as the Father. Trinitarians often claim they believe the three divine Persons are identical etc.

Rufinus states elsewhere that Origen had used the word homoousion to designate the one substance of the Father and Son. The word homoousios Christian writers at Alexandria adopted the word to express the eternal origin of the Son from the Father.

In explaining Heb Origen wrote: Light without brightness is unthinkable. If that is true, there was never a time when the Son was not the Son. However one accounts for these obscurities, it seems unlikely that Origen could have signed the Nicene Creed ofin which the Son is declared to be from the ousia of the Father, and therefore homoousios (of one essence, substance or nature) with him (cf.

CommJohn ). Origen seems to have been the first ecclesiastical writer to use the word homoousios in a nontrinitarian context, but it is evident in his writings that he considered the Son's divinity lesser than the Father's, since he even calls the Son a creature. “Did Origen Apply the Word Homoousios to the Son?” Journal of Theological Studies (): SPU Library: Per BQT 4 ZJ Edwards, M.J.

“Origen’s Two Resurrections.” Journal of Theological Studies (): SPU Library: Per BQT 4 ZJ Edwards, Mark Julian. “Did Origen Apply the Word Homoousios to the Son?”. Homoousios and Homoiousios. Main articles: Homoousian and Chalcedonian The First Council of Nicaea in debated the terms homoousios and homoiousios.

The word homoousios means "same substance", whereas the word homoiousios means "similar substance". The council affirmed the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit () are of the homoousious (same substance).This is the source of the English.

Homoousios is one of the most important words in the Christian theological vocabulary, since it was used at the Council of Nicaea to express the divine consubstantiality of the Son with the : Pier Franco Beatrice.

Origen (d. ) used ousia in defining God as one genus of ousia, while being three, distinct species of hypostasis: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

The Synods of Antioch condemned the word homoousios (same essence) because it originated in pagan Greek philosophy. [citation needed] The Catholic Encyclopedia entry for Paul of Samosata. The Word "Homoousios" from Hellenism to Christianity PIER FRANCO BEATRICE Homoousios is one of the most important words in the Christian theological vocabulary, since it was used at the Council of Nicaea to express the divine consubstantiality of the Son with the Father.

How-ever, long and complicated debates have not yet produced any sig. Mark Julian Edwards, "Did Origen Apply the Word Homoousios to the Son?" Journal of Theological Studies (): M.J. Edwards, "Origen's Two Resurrections," Journal of Theological Studies (): Mark Julian Edwards, "Did Origen Apply the Word Homoousios to the Son?" Journal of Theological Studies (): Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Origen" by Mark J.

Edwards. This is an automatically generated and experimental page If everything goes well, this page should display the bibliography of the aforementioned article as it appears in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but with links added to PhilPapers records.

Homoiousios means "of similar substance," "of the similar essence." It was a term used in the fourth century by a heretical group to describe the relationship between the Father and the Son. This is an improper term to use when describing the relationship between the Father and the Son.

Apology for Origen: with On the Falsification of the Books of Origen by Rufinus Pamphilus, Thomas Scheck Presented here for the first time in English translation (from Rufinus's Latin version) is the Apology for Origen, the sole surviving work of St. Pamphilus of Caesarea (d.

AD), who was one of the most celebrated priest-martyrs of the. Homoiousios. Used by Eusebius of Caesarea, homoiousios means "of a similar substance". This is in contrast to the Nicene affirmation that Jesus and God the Father are homoousios, "of the same substance."Christians at that time believed that even if they were of similar substance, the result was a Jesus who was not identical with the redemptive God of the Old Testament.

The third meaning gave the word a materialistic tendency that would imply that the Father and Son are parts of the same stuff. The Council's defeat by Arianism It is not surprising -- given the possible differences in meaning of the word as outlined above -- that the Council by using the word "homoousios" could be called into question.

A Christian supporting the Council of Nicaea's Trinitarian doctrine that Jesus, as Son of God, is consubstantial with God the Father. [Late Latin homoūsiānus, from homoūsius, of same substance, from Greek homoousios: homo- homo- + ousiā, substance; see Homoiousian.] American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language.

Ratzinger distances himself from Balthasar's sympathies with the Origenist misericordia tradition, while at the same time reflecting deeply on the implications for an objectively redeemed humanity of Christ's descent into Sheol, the utter darkness of human loneliness and angst proper to sin and death.

Constantine required homoousios and understood it in a pagan Hermetic sense. This probably puts too much emphasis on Constantine's role.

Beatrice also makes the errors of 1) considering homoousios apart from ek tes ousias, 2) believing Stead's argument rules out the account of Ossius and Alexander choosing the word, and 3) requiring too strict a parallel of homoousios before Nicaea.

In JTS, ns 49 (), pp. –70 I proposed that, whereas in the Nicene creed the word homoousios means that the Son is not created, its function at Apology is to convey (by analogy rather than predication) that the Son is not independent of the Father.

Röwekamp’s otherwise excellent study seems to me to be marred by a propensity to lay at Rufinus’ door whatever he cannot account Author: M.

Edwards. Arius (Ancient Greek: Ἄρειος, AD or –) was an ascetic North African Christianpresbyter and priest in Alexandria, Egypt, of the church of Baucalis, who was of Libyanorigins.

His teachings about the nature of the Godhead, which emphasized the Father’s divinity over the Son and his opposition to Trinitarian Christology, made him a primary topic of the First Council of Nicea.

Both Origen and the Arians could never say that the Son was homoousios, "of one nature", or "consubstantial" with the Father. The Son's existence had to depend upon the deliberation and will of the Father, said the Arians, because otherwise it would appear that God had a Son "by nature", that is, "by necessity" and, as it were "unwillingly".

Homoousios is a Greek word meaning "same substance" or "same essence." It is used in the Nicene Creed to say that Jesus Christ is of one essence with the Father. Although it does not appear in the Bible, the fathers of the First Ecumenical Council ultimately decided that this was the best language to use concerning the Holy Trinity.

The competing term at that council was homoiousios meaning. For the Arian word they wrote "homoiousion." Later writers have used the nominative masculine, "homoousios" and "homoiousios." The great Latin writers did not thus transliterate the word, but, wrote "homousios," and for the heretical word "homooesios" or "homoesios.".

That same encyclopedia admits: “Homoousios does not appear in Scripture.”⁠ 13 No, the Bible does not use that word either for the holy spirit or for the Son as being consubstantial with God.

It was an unbiblical expression that helped lead to the unbiblical, indeed, antibiblical, doctrine of the Trinity. CRI, P.O. BoxCharlotte, NC Phone () and Fax () 2 was a time when the Son was not." Christ must be numbered among the created beings — File Size: 51KB.

Paul of Samosata (səmŏs`ətə), fl. –72, Syrian Christian theologian, heretical patriarch of Antioch. He was a friend and high official of Zenobia Zenobia, d. afterqu. hypostasis: [ hi-pos´tah-sis ] poor or stagnant circulation, often with a deposit or sediment, in a dependent part of the body or an organ.

For the early church fathers midterm Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free. Search. Create. Did Origen write many or only a few books. Over six thousand. What was the Hexapla. we worship christ, if the son is not god we are not made to share in the divine nature through him.

As usual, Von Balthasar did a wonderful job in the compilation of this collection. The thematic organization is very helpful, as is the entirety of the book, in allowing the reader to get quickly to the meat so to speak. This book is a very good prompt for further study and research into Origen and other early Christian by: 5.

Born in either or in Alexandria, Origen was raised in a Christian home. His father was most likely a prosperous and influential man, who provided his son with an education that was both Author: John R.

Franke. Might not the relationship of Son to Father be expressed by the term homoousios ("of the same substance"). Its use, however, by the Sabellian bishops of Libya had been condemned by Dionysius of Alexandria in the s, and, in a different sense, its use by Paul of Samosata had been condemned by the Council of Antioch in Did Origen apply the word 'homoousios' to the Son?

The last part of the book provides a relecture of the New Testament on the Trinity as an attestation to (and not as a proof-text for!).book, argues th at Thus we can see that the homoousios formula became the dividing line be-tween the two camps. when the Word becomes a Son; and another extension occurs when the : Bryan M.

Litfin.